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Mezquita de Cordoba

Our purpose for visiting Cordoba was to visit the Mezquita de Cordoba

Our purpose for visiting Cordoba was to visit the Mezquita de Cordoba

After our enjoyable walk into the centre of the old town of Cordoba we reached the Cathedral that houses the Mezquita de Cordoba (Grand Mosque).

The courtyard for the Cathedral is lovely and tranquil but quite hot in the summer!

The courtyard for the Cathedral is lovely and tranquil but quite hot in the summer!

The cathedral originally was a Catholic Christian basilica built in the 6th century. When Muslim Arabs conquered Spain in 711, the church was divided into Muslim and Christian halves until 784, when the Christian half was purchased by the Caliph and then the entire church was demolished (a section of the original floor can be seen under perspex today). The grand mosque of Cordoba was built on its ground. After the Reconquista, it was converted to a Roman Catholic church, which still stands and a nave was constructed.

The outside of the cathedral has lovely Arabesque screens

The outside of the cathedral has lovely Arabesque screens

This is what it's like looking out the Arabesque screens

This is what it’s like looking out the Arabesque screens

I felt a bit self conscious wandering around the mosque in summer clothes among Muslims from around the world who wandered around the mosque gazing with wonder at the amazing architecture and wore hijabs and concealing clothes.

The cathedral which has been built around the mosque is simply amazing

The cathedral which has been built around the mosque is simply amazing

The Mezquita is definitely worth visiting. It’s simply enormous and over an hour can easily be spent wandering around and enjoying looking at the different styles of architecture and ornamentation. The red and white striped arches are incredible to behold. The mosque was built by the Umayyad prince who fled Syria and eventually arrived in the South of Spain via North Africa. Apparently the striped poles of the arches were designed to resemble the palm trees in the oases of Syria.

I could rhapsodise all day about Arab architecture in the South of Spain

I could rhapsodise all day about Arab architecture in the South of Spain

It’s fascinating to see the Christian over printing that has been done on the mosque and I’m very grateful that the Christians didn’t simply demolish the mosque and start over.

Christian stamp on a Muslim structure

Christian stamp on a Muslim structure

And here it is: the Mihrab of the Mezquita de Cordoba

And here it is: the Mihrab of the Mezquita de Cordoba

The Mihrab of the Mezquita de Cordoba is very famous and it is one of the most exquisite structures that I have seen anywhere in the world.

This is what the dome above the Mihrab looks like

This is what the dome above the Mihrab looks like

Byzantine architecture is exquisite!

Byzantine architecture is exquisite!

I’m definitely glad that we added Cordoba to our itinerary!

I love the lanterns that are suspended from the arches

I love the lanterns that are suspended from the arches

I admire the use of natural light in the Christian part of the cathedral/mosque

I admire the use of natural light in the Christian part of the cathedral/mosque

A portion of the original floor of the 6th Century Basilica

A portion of the original floor of the 6th Century Basilica

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This entry was posted on August 2, 2015 by in Travel and tagged , , , , , , , .
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