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Camping in Ben Boyd National Park – part 1

Swamp wallaby at our campsite at Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Swamp wallaby at our campsite at Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

This was a long and challenging year for all 4 of us, with our 5 year old son completing kindergarten, our 7 year old daughter completing year 2 and graduating from her Early Childhood School. For some crazy reason our children had every week: swimming lessons, up to 4 martial arts classes, soccer and Indonesian lessons in addition to full time school. Understandably they were exhausted and so were we. My husband started a new job and spent a couple of months as sole carer while I was travelling for work. I established and remotely manage a lab in the Middle East and I now work my own Australian working day and theirs so that I’m approaching snapping point.

So, we sought a campsite for solitude and relaxation. Three colleagues recommended Ben Boyd National Park so we took a week off work and booked a site at Bittangabee Bay campsite.

Goanna at our campsite at Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Goanna at our campsite at Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

We’ve had bad experiences at campsites previously with generators, music players, louts with loud voices etc but not at Bittangabee Bay! Our campsite was quiet, with many other campers who were respectful of others. Perhaps this was helped by the lack of electricity, phone signal, showers and drinking water and the long and bumpy dirt access track. Wildlife abounded in the campsite including wonga pigeons, goannas, swamp wallabies, kangaroos, a lyrebird (about 800m from the campsite) many other types of birds and we even saw a wombat one night!

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Our children instantly settled into the new environment and within minutes of our arrival they were climbing in trees while we setup the tent. They also loved playing with rocks and building a rock village complete with gods. Our spot was the last available and also the worst because it was a thoroughfare to several other sites and the pit toilets, next to a carpark for 5 cars, and a drainage channel during rain. We knew that rain was forecast most days of our stay so we placed our tent on a gentle slope out of the walk way and drainage zone.

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

It’s a very short walk from the campsite to the beach and knowing that rain was coming we headed straight to the beach on our first morning.

Our commodious tent

Our commodious tent

Our children delighted in playing on the sand and splashing in the water while we read our books.

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park

We drove to City Rock and while our son slept in the car, my daughter and I walked 500m down through a malaleuca forest, that had been burnt in a bushfire, to City Rock. She delighted in time with me without her brother, admiring the flowers and clambering over rocks. It was really beautiful on the rock platform.

The walk to City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

The walk to City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

My daughter asked me to take photos of the bush regeneration on the way to the rock platform.

Beautiful fungus

Beautiful fungus

Afterwards we played hopscotch in the dirt while waiting for my son and husband to wake from their naps.

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The walk to City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

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The walk to City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

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Regeneration after bush fire on the walk to City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

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City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

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City Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

From there we drove to Pulpit Rock and the four of us enjoyed climbing on the rock platform, admiring the quartz cemented en echelon fractures and climbing through a natural tunnel.

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Fabulous en echelon fractures with quartz infilling at Pulpit Rock in Ben Boyd National Park

We enjoyed walking down to Green Cape, looking at the lighthouse and imagining the lives of the lighthouse keepers.

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Green Cape Lighthouse in Ben Boyd National Park

What a great start to a wonderfully relaxing and nourishing week of camping!

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3 comments on “Camping in Ben Boyd National Park – part 1

  1. Pingback: Camping in Ben Boyd National Park – part 2 | strivetoengage

  2. Pingback: Book Review – Chicago – 4 Stars | strivetoengage

  3. Pingback: From Ben Boyd National Park to Melbourne | strivetoengage

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This entry was posted on December 27, 2014 by in Nature and tagged , , , , , .
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