strivetoengage

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Bush walk – Mt Tennent

View of Mount Tennent from the start of the walk at Namadgi Visitor Centre

View of Mount Tennent from the start of the walk at Namadgi Visitor Centre

Today we reveled in a day together without children and embarked on a strenuous bush walk that would have been too difficult for our children. We drove to Namadgi Visitor Centre in Namadgi National Park, had a quick chat with the ranger and set off to climb Mount Tennent. The visitor centre is nicely laid out with informative signs, a live carpet python, and a shop. We passed a Woodlands loop track that would be easy for children and elderly people to traverse and has a shed with more informative signs inside. We continued to the road crossing and registered for the walk then began the ascent.

The track is well sign-posted

The track is well sign-posted

The track is well sign-posted and steep in parts but never difficult in terms of footing. There are a few wooden seats along the way and Cypress Lookout makes a nice break after the first short ascent. When we reached the lookout we encountered a group of about fourteen teenage boys with Outward Bound guides who were on their 5th day of a 7 day hike. The head guide was friendly and showed us on his map where we were to go next. The boys responded promptly when the head guide told them it was time to move on and shouldered their heavy packs without complaint. We then passed them again about 2 hours later as we descended and they made their slow way towards the summit. We also passed a group of friendly teenage girls on an Outward Bound hike and shared cheerful greetings and jokes about their packs.

Output from My Tracks app showing the elevation versus distance.

Output from My Tracks app showing the elevation versus distance.

Cypress Lookout

Cypress Lookout

At a few points along the track we had lovely vistas of the forest and the valley.

Lovely granite, forest and vista

Lovely granite, forest and vista

The vegetation changes from dry eucalypt forest near the visitor centre to tall stands of beautiful gums with grasses underneath and some snow gums near the summit. The rock formations are beautiful with granite full of phenocrysts and mineralised joints and some tors.

This tor was amongst a few others and struck me as beautiful

This tor was among a few others and struck me as beautiful

Beautiful forest

Beautiful forest

We encountered many different reptiles from a brown snake that thankfully slithered away from us, to many types of lizards and a goanna that decided to stay put as we descended and almost walked upon it. I had such a fright from the goanna that my legs wobbled vigorously even though it clearly had no interest in us! We saw a few types of ants, a few kangaroos, some galahs nesting in a tree but not many other animals. We encountered two other walkers besides the two groups of teenagers.

One of the many types of lizards that crossed our path (a skink I think)

One of the many types of lizards that crossed our path

This goanna was resting and didn't move when we almost walked upon it

This goanna was resting and didn’t move when we almost walked upon it

IMG_3749_blog

Example of what the track is like

Most of the walk is on a narrow rock trail but 1km from the summit the trail opens onto a fire-trail that gives access to the fire lookout tower on the summit (closed to the public).

At this point the track joins the fire-trail

At this point the track joins the fire-trail

We enjoyed the view at the summit and briefly it felt like we were the only people around. Visibility was imperfect perhaps due to bush-fire smoke and also the thunderstorm that was rolling in from the south.

It was easy to believe that we were far from the nearest city even though a city was  ~10km behind us.

It was easy to believe that we were far from the nearest city even though a city was ~10km behind us.

View from the summit

View from the summit

We walked fast worried that we wouldn’t complete the hike in time to pick up our children from school but ended up finishing the walk one hour earlier than the expected 5 hours. Just as we climbed into the car the thunderstorm reached us and we drove slowly through torrential rain with plenty of time to spare. It was a lovely walk that we will do again.

Output from My Tracks app

Output from My Tracks app

More information in other posts on Mount Tennent:

http://inthetaratory.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/dominating-mt-tennent/

http://vk1nam.wordpress.com/2013/03/10/mt-tennent-vk1ac-026-10-march-2013-2/

http://www.backyardproject.com.au/blog/mt-tennent/

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9 comments on “Bush walk – Mt Tennent

  1. Gwen Tuinman
    February 19, 2014

    I am enjoying the photographic details of your journeys. It is a nice switch from the mounds of snow that continue to collect here. Also, the My Track app is very interesting and something I would be interested in trying out on some travels later this year.

    • strivetoengage
      February 20, 2014

      Thanks! I’ve never lived somewhere that snows but I can appreciate your point about monotony. The app is easy to use and it’s interesting to see the statistics. Where are you going on your travels?

  2. Andrew VK1NAM
    February 20, 2014

    Try Booroomba Rocks, the formation comprises of 3 peaks, the southern peak is the summit and a tad difficult to reach. Awesome cliffs on the west face. Good luck with your next adventure.

  3. Pingback: Bush walk – Mt Tennent via the fire trail | strivetoengage

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This entry was posted on February 19, 2014 by in Nature and tagged , , , , .
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